How to Start Exercising with Chronic Pain and Fatigue – 5 Rules

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Last Updated on December 1, 2021 by melissanreynolds

We are often told to start exercising when we have chronic pain and fatigue. But we aren’t really told how to do it safely and without increasing our symptoms.

It really does depend on what your goals are for your exercise.

how to start exercising with fibromyalgia

I love yoga because it’s got some great side benefits. I am all about improving my quality of life. I would rather exercise for 10 good minutes and see symptom improvement, than the “recommended” amounts and see no improvement – or worse, an increase in symptoms.

So, in this video and post I am sharing my top five rules to start exercising with chronic pain and fatigue.

Start low and go slow

Take where you think you are able to start and reduce that by about 30%.

If you want help with getting started try my five minutes a day for five days yoga pose challenge.

So, how do you know when to move up…

Listen to your body.

Does it feel good at the time?

How do you feel after your practice?

And how do you feel over the next couple of days?

Do what you will like and do

If we don’t like it, why would we prioritise it when we are tired and in pain (aka all the time)? Take some time to find what you like. And then commit to it for a time to make it a habit.

Quality not quantity

You are better off doing one great push-up than 10 poor-quality ones. The concept works with yoga, walking, and anything else. Do less with good form so you don’t add to your bodily stress and tension.

Starting your practice with gentle stretching from bed? The Gentle Stretch in Bed Series is perfect for you!

Read more

Ultimate Guide to Managing Fibromyalgia

Yoga Nidra for FIbromyalgia

Yoga for Chronic Pain and Fatigue

5 guidelines to start exercising with fibromyalgia, chronic pain and fatigue. Woman doing tree pose in front of water.

Yoga for Fibromyalgia Framework

My “framework” is: Breathe – Stretch – Rest. I believe in working with the central nervous system, not against it.

Also, I would argue the breathing and resting are more important than the stretching portion. But the beauty of this framework is that you can adapt it to your energy levels and needs on any given day.

5 minutes to breathe, 5 minutes to stretch, 10 minutes to rest.

2 minutes to breathe, 6 minutes to stretch, 2 minutes to rest.



So these are my five “rules” for starting exercise with chronic pain and fatigue. What would you add?

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